Insight Blog - Tags: Sport England

Tags: Sport England

Posted: Mon, 08 Jun 2020 13:00 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 8: 22-25 May

While the overall activity levels remained stable, running and jogging levels reached a new peak, as did informal play at home, and some inequalities lessened.

  • 21% of adults did less activity this week than the week before, while 32% did more
  • 64% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 71% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 65% using it to manage their mental health
  • 64% of adults walked in the last week, 22% jogged, 14% cycled and 45% did home-based activity
  • 32% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 22% are doing more than an hour.

With the slight easing in restrictions, 'other' sport and physical activity category increased as people added more variety into how they got active.

Of those in the C2DE group, 33% did at least 30 minutes of physical activity on five separate days in the week – the highest percentage yet.

And the figure for disabled people or those with a long-term health condition is up to 29%, while the value for females (33%, compared to 35% of males) was at its highest level since week one.

People are also finding it easier to be active, with 70& of people – the highest yet – saying they have more time to be active and 41%, compared to 36% the week before, finding it easier to be active.

Data from c. 2,000 respondents was weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade.

Full data tables can be found on the Savanta ComRes website.

Tags: COVID-19, June, Sport England

Posted: Sat, 30 May 2020 12:00 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 7: 15-18 May

In the first week since lockdown restrictions were eased, activity levels were at their highest since the survey began – but yet the inequalities remained.

  • 23% of adults did less activity this week than the week before, while 29% did more
  • 65% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 73% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 66% using it to manage their mental health
  • 65% of adults walked in the last week, 20% jogged, 16% cycled and 45% did home-based activity
  • 34% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 20% are doing more than an hour.

Almost every group surveyed saw an increase in their activity levels – many to their highest level since the survey began – but there are still inequalities in people's activity levels.

Only 11% of people said they did no activity in the last week, the lowest figure yet, while 35% of adults said they did at least 30 minutes of activity, at least five times a week – the highest figure yet.

And while only 7% of children did no activity, the lowest yet, the number of children doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day increased from 30% to 34%, while the number doing more than an hour a day went from 22% to 20%.

Walking and cycling both hit peak figures, while people's attitudes and motivations towards physical activity continue to be positive.

Tags: COVID-19, sport england

Posted: Tue, 26 May 2020 10:00 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 6: 8-11 May

With little change in the figures, home-based activity reduced and the gender gap remains with men more likely to be doing 30 minutes of activity a day, five times a week, and women more likely to be doing less activity than normal.

  • 37% of adults did less activity this week than before the restrictions, while 33% did more
  • 64% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 70% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 61% using it to manage their mental health
  • 63% of adults walked in the last week, 19% jogged, 13% cycled and 43% did home-based activity
  • 30% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 22% are doing more than an hour.

As the survey covering the initial phase of government restrictions comes to an end, it is clear that inequalities from activity levels pre-coronavirus, are maintained and even strengthened during the pandemic.

Men have been more likely to do more activity than women, while greater affluence as appears to correlate with greater activity levels and those from black, Asian or ethnic minority (BAME) backgrounds are less likely to be active during the pandemic.

On a positive note, people's attitude towards activity appear to be improving, with Week 6 seeing the highest level of people considering activity more important now than pre-coronavirus.

Also, the number of people walking and cycling has increased over the first six weeks of the survey, and while home-based activity reduced in Week 6, that could be attributed to the improved weather.

Data from c. 2,000 respondents was weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade.

Full data tables can be found on the Savanta ComRes website.

Tags: COVID-19, Herefordshire, Insight, May, Sport England, Worcestershire

Posted: Thu, 14 May 2020 09:10 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 5: 1-4 May

Activity levels are relatively unchanged for adults and children, with the gender gap persisting, but home-based activity has increased and attitudes around activity have also improved.

  • 36% of adults did less activity this week than before the restrictions, while 35% did more
  • 61% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 67% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 62% using it to manage their mental health
  • 61% of adults walked in the last week, 19% jogged, 13% cycled and 48% did home-based activity
  • 35% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 19% are doing more than an hour.

Overall, there has been a decrease in the number of people doing fewer than 30 minutes of physical on no days during the week.

And while the gender gap persists in terms of the number of people doing at least 30 minutes of activity on five or more days a week, the figures for each gender saying they're doing more, or less, than usual are much closer this week.

Home-based activity levels also improved this week and is up to its highest level yet at 48%.

And while there has been a steady increase over the course of the survey in people saying they are finding new ways to get active, 84% of gym or leisure centre members says they're likely to resume their membership when facilities reopen.

Tags: COVID-19, Insight, Sport England

Posted: Thu, 07 May 2020 14:35 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 4: 24-27 April

Adults are reporting consistent physical activity levels over the period of the restrictions, however, more people now feel they're doing more, as opposed to less, physical activity than usual.

34% of adults did less activity this week than before the restrictions, while 35% did more
59% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
66% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 62% using it to manage their mental health
61% of adults walked in the last week, 20% jogged, 11% cycled and 41% did home-based activity
35% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 18% are doing more than an hour.
The gender gap is widening, with 38% of females reporting being less active than usual, compared to 30% of males.

Home-based activities are continuing to decline, while outdoor activities continue to grow, but people may be losing the motivation to be active.

Fewer people are reporting exercise as enjoyable and satisfying, fewer agree that regular exercise is important to them and fewer are feeling guilty when they don't exercise. Conversely, fewer people feel guilty about wanting to exercise during the outbreak.

Inequalities in activity levels persist, with women, older people, people on low incomes, people living alone, people without children in the household, people with a long-term health condition, people without access to private outdoor space and people self-isolating because they're at increased risk, all finding it harder to be active.

Tags: COVID-19, Insight, Sport England

Posted: Tue, 05 May 2020 15:30 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 3 17-20 April

Adults continue to report similar levels of physical activity, but there's an emerging gender gap, with more males likely to be exercising more than usual, than females.

  • 38% of adults did less activity this week than before the restrictions, while 34% did more
  • 63% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 70% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 63% using it to manage their mental health
  • 60% of adults walked in the last week, 19% jogged, 12% cycled and 45% did home-based activity
  • 36% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 14% are doing more than an hour.

There's an emerging gender gap as males are more likely to be exercising more. In this wave, more males report doing more (37%) than less (35%) physical activity compared to usual – a significant change from week 1 where 29% said more and 43% said less.

Female activity levels have not changed (currently 32% more, 41% less), where participation in 30 minutes of physical activity on at least five days in the last week has fallen from week 1 (35% to 29%).

We've also seen a decline in online exercise (23% in week 1 to 19% now), as people adjust to exercising out of the home and fewer people report worrying about leaving their home to exercise (60% in week 1 to 56% now).

Tags: COVID-19, Insight, Sport England

Posted: Sun, 03 May 2020 15:00 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 2: 10-14 April

Adults are reporting similar levels of physical activity to the previous week, while children's activity levels are up slightly.

  • 40% of adults did less activity this week than before the restrictions, while 33% did more
  • 59% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 70% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 64% using it to manage their mental health
  • 59% of adults walked in the last week, 16% jogged, 10% cycled and 45% did home-based activity
  • 35% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 18% are doing more than an hour.

There are still differences in levels of activity between different demographic groups, while we've also seen a dip in women's activity levels, with fewer women than men achieving 30 minutes of activity on five or more days, and more women than men doing no activity.

More people are agreeing that they don't find exercising on their own enjoyable, and that they feel guilty about wanting to exercise during the outbreak.

Tags: COVID-19, Insight, Sport England

Posted: Fri, 01 May 2020 14:30 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 1: 3-6 April 2020

There's been a massive disruption in the physical activity behaviours of adults and children in England.

  • 41% of adults did less activity this week than before the restrictions, while 31% did more
  • 62% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 69% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 65% using it to manage their mental health
  • 59% of adults walked in the last week, 18% jogged, 8% cycled and 44% did home-based activity
  • 36% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 14% are doing more than an hour.

The government's messages about exercise may be having a positive impact, with 55% of adults in England agreeing that they've been encouraged to exercise by the government guidance.

But there are differences in levels of activity between different demographic groups. Older people, people on low incomes and people living in urban areas or living alone are finding it harder to be active during the outbreak.

Tags: COVID-19, Insight, Sport England, Weekly

Posted: Sat, 25 Apr 2020 11:00 by Thomas Lawley

Active Lives Release - April Insight

Active Lives Release - April Insight

Hello and welcome to April's edition to the insight blog. I hope you are well and are coping during this unusual lockdown period.

This month's blog is on the recent Sport England Active Lives Adult Survey results release on Thursday (23rd). Alongside Sport England's COVID-19 survey. Covering attitudes and behaviours in relation to physical activity, and how COVID-19 has affected them.

Active Lives Results

The Active Lives survey is Sport England's method for measuring the nation's activity levels. There are two surveys, Active Lives Adult, which is published twice a year, and Active Lives Children and Young People, which is published annually.

This particular Active Lives Adult Survey is an unusual release. Covering the 12 months from November 2018 to November 2019, this report provides a picture of physical activity behaviours of adults in England prior to the current coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic and the subsequent social distancing guidelines.

The Active Lives Survey measures physical activity as bouts of 10 minutes or more at moderate intensity* that add up to one of the three predefined levels of activity (*vigorous intensity counts as double). Activities include; cycling for sport and leisure or travel, walking for leisure or travel, dance, sporting activities and fitness activities. It's important to note that the survey counts most sport and physical activity but excludes gardening. However, Public Health England does include gardening in its local level physical activity data. The survey separates activity into three predefined categories; active (at least 150 minutes a week), fairly active (an average of 30-149 minutes a week) and inactive (less than 30 minutes a week).

Table 1 displays the sport and physical activity levels for the Herefordshire and Worcestershire area. It's good news that for each area, over half the population is active and completing 150+ minutes of exercise a week. Conversely less than 25% of each area is inactive.

Table 2 displays Sport and Physical Activity Level by Active Partnerships and Local Authority (changes from baseline), we can see if there have been any significant changes from baseline. This refers to any changes of significance since the Active Lives Survey Adult started collecting data. Wychavon have experienced the biggest change since baseline, with a 9.1% increase in people becoming active. Alongside that, this change is also reflected in a -6.6% significant decrease in those who are inactive. Worcestershire and Bromsgrove also saw significant changes, with both seeing increases in their fairly active population (2.5% and 5.3% respectively).

Table 3, the final table of this month's insight blog is a similar to the previous table. Instead of measuring changes from baseline, this table measures changes in the last 12 months. Herefordshire & Worcestershire have shown some encouraging signs, with a 3.0% increase in people becoming active. This significant increase is reflected on the other end of the scale with a -3.2% decrease in inactive people. This is fantastic news for both counties, and hopefully means we're on the right track to getting everyone fit and active! Finally, as with the previous table, Wychavon have seen massive changes in their active and inactive population. A 10.2% increase in the active population in the last 12 months ago, coupled with a -7.6% decrease in the inactive population within the same time period.

Covid-19 headlines

Sport England alongside their usual Active Lives release, have also been documenting the populations activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity since the start of the Covid-19. Sport England will be conducting a weekly survey to gage any changes in behaviours or attitudes as the pandemic continues. The following are the headlines taken from Sport England's insight briefing.

Headlines:

There has been a massive disruption in the physical activity behaviours of adults and children. 33% of adults did more and 39% did less physical activity in the last week compared to before the lockdown restrictions. This is to be expected, as the lockdown has closed gyms, restricted groups exercise and brought some confusion on what is allowed and not allowed.

In more encouraging news: there is a growing recognition of the importance of physical activity in response to the pandemic. 63% of adults believe it's more important to be active now, during the outbreak compared to other times. Perhaps this is in response to idea that being fit and healthy is a key indicator is your ability to fight off and recover from Covid-19. Or adults are seeing physical activity has a way to break up the day to prevent cabin fever. Either way it's encouraging to see physical activity's importance on the up.

In keeping with the theme of the growing importance of physical activity in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The majority of adults have identified physical activity as a key tool to managing their health throughout this lockdown period. 71% of adults agree that exercise helps manage their physical health, whilst 67% agree what it helps manage their mental health.

All in all, this in encouraging news to see people utilising physical activity during this uncertain time! For more information on Sport England's Covid-19 survey, you can access the full report and data tables here - http://www.comresglobal.com/polls/sport-england-survey-into-adult-physical-activity-attitudes-and-behaviour/

Tags: Active Lives, Blog, Herefordshire, Insight, Physical Activity, Sport England, Worcestershire

Posted: Mon, 03 Feb 2020 15:00 by Thomas Lawley

January - New Year, New Blog

Hello and happy New Year. Welcome to the first insight blog of 2020!

In the spirit of the main stream fashion of 'new year, new me'. The insight blogs will be changing slightly as we begin the New Year. The blogs will still provide you with all the good stuff like; funding bids, research projects, key projects provided by us at Sports Partnership Herefordshire and Worcestershire, as well as insight about Herefordshire and Worcestershire. However, to try and give this blogs more of a focus and hopefully make them more relevant, future blogs will be taking on a key theme for each month.

This month's theme is Women and Girls coinciding with the relaunch of Sport England's 'This Girl Can'.

Insight

Here at Sports Partnership Herefordshire and Worcestershire, we've just had our own This Girl Can conference. The aim of this conference was to educate leisure providers, schools and local development officers of the gender gap that we face locally and nationally when it comes to physical activity participation. Alongside tackling the participation gap, we are also looking to try and provide support for mental health issues that face women and girls in their everyday life, which in turn become barriers to participation.

The Stats

The Active Lives May 18/19 report details participation rates across England. The report revealed that there is still a gender gap in terms of participation. Women (61%) are less likely to be active than men (65%). Conversely Women (26%) are more likely to be inactive than men (24%). More locally the picture remains the same – women (57.6%) across Herefordshire and Worcestershire are less likely to be active than men (63.9%). This gap is maintained when looking at both county's individually. With Worcestershire women (58.1%) being marginally more active than women (56.2%) in Herefordshire, but still are less active than their male counterparts.

As with adults, the gender gap always exists in children and young people. According to Sport England's most recent publication (academic year 18/19), under half (43%) of girls are active for 60 minutes every day. This, in comparison to boys, where just over half (51%) are active for 60 minutes a day. Although it is not all doom and gloom as both boys and girls saw an increase in participation from last year (Boys: +3.8%, Girls: 3.2%). What seems to be more concerning is that young girls (30%) are more inactive than boys (27%), evidencing a gender gap on both sides of physical activity participation. This trend where girls are less active than boys is seen across all ages, with the largest gap appearing in years 7-11 (9% difference).

Why is there a participation gap?

So, clearly there is an issue where women and girls are taking part in sport or physical activity. This on its own is useless to everyone. So why are women and girls less likely to take part? Research from Sport England has suggested that there are several reasons that can be attributed to the gender participation gap. Firstly, young girl's attitudes to sport are different to young boys. Young girls are said to have very binary views when it comes to participating in Sport or physical activity. By this it's meant that girls either see themselves as good or bad at an activity, and this has a massive impact on whether they are will take part or not. Boys however do not appear to hold as much relevance to their ability when deciding to take part in an activity or not. Secondly, girls are less likely to enjoy being active than boys. As part of Sport England's Active Lives Children and Young People survey detailed children's attitudes towards sport and physical activity. The results show that girls are less confident in taking part in sport or physical activity, which in turn impacts their subsequent enjoyment. Thirdly, research from Women in Sport has highlighted that pressure of school work and low confidence present themselves as substantial barriers to taking part for girls. Women in Sport's research stated that alongside pressure of school work, dissatisfaction with their body image represents a significant barrier to girls. Body image represents a larger problem for girls (1 in 3) at ages 14-16 years, than younger girls ages 13 and below. Finally, it has been reported that girls simply do not see the relevance of the skills they learn in PE to their lives (45% of girls compared to 60% of boys).

How do we solve these problems?

There is no catch all approach to solving the women and girls participation issue. However, there are steps that can be taken which can create a more positive environment for women and girls to feel safe and motivated to participate in sport and physical activity.

Recommendations for schools (from Women in Sport)

1. Make PE and physical activity relevant to girls' lives.

2. Empower girls through involving them in design and delivery of PE and physical activities.

3. Develop role models by using girls as positive influencers and advocates with their peer group.

4. Place developing self-confidence at the heart of PE and physical activity.

5. Recognise the power of friends to drive progress.

6. Take a long-term approach to engaging girls.

Recommendations for activity providers and organisations (Sport England)

1) Start where women are – being real and friendly will engage women

- Use their language: friendly and informal

- Use pictures and images of real women

- Show an understanding of real issues (looking sweaty, pressure of time)

2) Show women what sport can do for them personally – they want to feel confident doing sport

- Use real role models showing women confident being themselves (hot and not bothered)

3) Show women that sport is a good use of their time socially

- Communicate that this is a good use of their time – having some run time with the girls (or their kids)

4) Design the offer to make it easy for women to do sport – don't expect women to change to fit sport

- Right time – be open or run classes to suit women's lifestyle (work and family)

- Right place – close to where women are, with the right facilities (changing rooms, hairdryers etc)

- Right welcome – make sure the welcome is warm by reception/ class leaders

- Right company – ideally they should be with people like them

- Right gear – reduce the fear of the wrong gear

5) Focus on repeat participation – ensure you design the offer to keep women engaged, not just to attend once

- Once engaged, keep in touch with them

- Encourage communities of interest: women spending with their kids, with the girls (meeting up after for food or drink), or seeking to achieve more

- Make your communications personal

- Appeal to all the senses (music etc)

Thanks for reading, and make sure you get active yourself!

Links and references

Gender Gap – Attitudes towards physical activity in teenagers

Sport England – Sport for All? January 2020

Sport England – Active Lives Adult Survey – May 18/19, November 17/18

Sport England – Active Lives Adult Survey – Understanding behaviour

Sport England – Active Lives Children and Young People Survey – Academic Year 2017/18

Sport England – Active Lives Children and Young People Survey – Attitudes towards sport and physical activity

Sport England - Applying the insight – women & girls checklist

Tags: Active Lives, Blog, Herefordshire, Insight, January, Sport England, Sports Partnership, This Girl Can, Women and Girls, Women in Sport, Worcestershire

Tom Lawley

Tom Lawley

Project Officer (Information and Insight)

  • Insight
  • Data analysis
  • Monitoring and evaluation
  • Active Lives
Telephone
01905 542380