Insight Blog - Tags: Worcestershire

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Posted: Tue, 26 May 2020 10:00 by Thomas Lawley

Sport England Insight Briefing

To supplement the Active Lives Surveys (Adult and Children & Young People), Sport England are publishing a series of briefings providing a regular picture of physical activity behaviours and attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the government issuing guidance on social distancing and limiting people to one piece of outdoor exercise a day, Sport England commissioned Savanta ComRes to conduct regular surveys. Each week, over a three-day period, Savanta ComRes survey 2,000 adults to assess their activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity.

Data has been weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade, including those with children aged under 16 in their households.

To read the latest briefing yourself, please click here.

Week 6: 8-11 May

With little change in the figures, home-based activity reduced and the gender gap remains with men more likely to be doing 30 minutes of activity a day, five times a week, and women more likely to be doing less activity than normal.

  • 37% of adults did less activity this week than before the restrictions, while 33% did more
  • 64% of adults think it's more important to be active during the outbreak compared to other times
  • 70% of adults agree exercise is helping them manage their physical health, with 61% using it to manage their mental health
  • 63% of adults walked in the last week, 19% jogged, 13% cycled and 43% did home-based activity
  • 30% of children, according to adults in their household, are doing fewer than 30 minutes of activity a day, while 22% are doing more than an hour.

As the survey covering the initial phase of government restrictions comes to an end, it is clear that inequalities from activity levels pre-coronavirus, are maintained and even strengthened during the pandemic.

Men have been more likely to do more activity than women, while greater affluence as appears to correlate with greater activity levels and those from black, Asian or ethnic minority (BAME) backgrounds are less likely to be active during the pandemic.

On a positive note, people's attitude towards activity appear to be improving, with Week 6 seeing the highest level of people considering activity more important now than pre-coronavirus.

Also, the number of people walking and cycling has increased over the first six weeks of the survey, and while home-based activity reduced in Week 6, that could be attributed to the improved weather.

Data from c. 2,000 respondents was weighted to be representative of adults in England by age, gender, region and social grade.

Full data tables can be found on the Savanta ComRes website.

Tags: COVID-19, Herefordshire, Insight, May, Sport England, Worcestershire

Posted: Sat, 25 Apr 2020 11:00 by Thomas Lawley

Active Lives Release - April Insight

Active Lives Release - April Insight

Hello and welcome to April's edition to the insight blog. I hope you are well and are coping during this unusual lockdown period.

This month's blog is on the recent Sport England Active Lives Adult Survey results release on Thursday (23rd). Alongside Sport England's COVID-19 survey. Covering attitudes and behaviours in relation to physical activity, and how COVID-19 has affected them.

Active Lives Results

The Active Lives survey is Sport England's method for measuring the nation's activity levels. There are two surveys, Active Lives Adult, which is published twice a year, and Active Lives Children and Young People, which is published annually.

This particular Active Lives Adult Survey is an unusual release. Covering the 12 months from November 2018 to November 2019, this report provides a picture of physical activity behaviours of adults in England prior to the current coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic and the subsequent social distancing guidelines.

The Active Lives Survey measures physical activity as bouts of 10 minutes or more at moderate intensity* that add up to one of the three predefined levels of activity (*vigorous intensity counts as double). Activities include; cycling for sport and leisure or travel, walking for leisure or travel, dance, sporting activities and fitness activities. It's important to note that the survey counts most sport and physical activity but excludes gardening. However, Public Health England does include gardening in its local level physical activity data. The survey separates activity into three predefined categories; active (at least 150 minutes a week), fairly active (an average of 30-149 minutes a week) and inactive (less than 30 minutes a week).

Table 1 displays the sport and physical activity levels for the Herefordshire and Worcestershire area. It's good news that for each area, over half the population is active and completing 150+ minutes of exercise a week. Conversely less than 25% of each area is inactive.

Table 2 displays Sport and Physical Activity Level by Active Partnerships and Local Authority (changes from baseline), we can see if there have been any significant changes from baseline. This refers to any changes of significance since the Active Lives Survey Adult started collecting data. Wychavon have experienced the biggest change since baseline, with a 9.1% increase in people becoming active. Alongside that, this change is also reflected in a -6.6% significant decrease in those who are inactive. Worcestershire and Bromsgrove also saw significant changes, with both seeing increases in their fairly active population (2.5% and 5.3% respectively).

Table 3, the final table of this month's insight blog is a similar to the previous table. Instead of measuring changes from baseline, this table measures changes in the last 12 months. Herefordshire & Worcestershire have shown some encouraging signs, with a 3.0% increase in people becoming active. This significant increase is reflected on the other end of the scale with a -3.2% decrease in inactive people. This is fantastic news for both counties, and hopefully means we're on the right track to getting everyone fit and active! Finally, as with the previous table, Wychavon have seen massive changes in their active and inactive population. A 10.2% increase in the active population in the last 12 months ago, coupled with a -7.6% decrease in the inactive population within the same time period.

Covid-19 headlines

Sport England alongside their usual Active Lives release, have also been documenting the populations activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity since the start of the Covid-19. Sport England will be conducting a weekly survey to gage any changes in behaviours or attitudes as the pandemic continues. The following are the headlines taken from Sport England's insight briefing.

Headlines:

There has been a massive disruption in the physical activity behaviours of adults and children. 33% of adults did more and 39% did less physical activity in the last week compared to before the lockdown restrictions. This is to be expected, as the lockdown has closed gyms, restricted groups exercise and brought some confusion on what is allowed and not allowed.

In more encouraging news: there is a growing recognition of the importance of physical activity in response to the pandemic. 63% of adults believe it's more important to be active now, during the outbreak compared to other times. Perhaps this is in response to idea that being fit and healthy is a key indicator is your ability to fight off and recover from Covid-19. Or adults are seeing physical activity has a way to break up the day to prevent cabin fever. Either way it's encouraging to see physical activity's importance on the up.

In keeping with the theme of the growing importance of physical activity in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The majority of adults have identified physical activity as a key tool to managing their health throughout this lockdown period. 71% of adults agree that exercise helps manage their physical health, whilst 67% agree what it helps manage their mental health.

All in all, this in encouraging news to see people utilising physical activity during this uncertain time! For more information on Sport England's Covid-19 survey, you can access the full report and data tables here - http://www.comresglobal.com/polls/sport-england-survey-into-adult-physical-activity-attitudes-and-behaviour/

Tags: Active Lives, Blog, Herefordshire, Insight, Physical Activity, Sport England, Worcestershire

Posted: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 12:16 by Thomas Lawley

March Madness

Hello and welcome to March's addition to the insight blog. This month's insight focuses on women and girls, and ties in with the launch of our This Girl Can School Campaign. Sadly, there is a stubborn inequality in the physical activity levels between males and females. This blog edition will explore the participation rates of women and girls and their barriers to participation. In line with the evolution of our This Girl Can campaign, this month's blog edition will also incorporate some insight surrounding Ante-natal and Post-natal women. Sources used will be cited at the end and links to organisations doing fantastic work to engage women will also be linked.

Women and Girls Participation Levels

As you can see in the tables below there is an obvious disparity in levels of physical activity participation between males and females. Males are more likely to be active than females, with this trend visible nationally as well as locally. The same is true for Children and Young People (CYP), where boys (51%) are more likely to be active than girls (43%) (Achieving the Chief Medical Officer (CMO) guidelines of 60+ minutes a day).

There are many reasons given as to why women and girls tend to be less active than their male counterparts. Whilst everyone's reason for being active or inactive is individual to themselves, there are some general themes that arise.

Among children and young people, research suggests that girls' participation is often determined by their perceived ability within a given activity. Girls are less likely to participate in activities in which they have a lower perceived ability, whereas boys are likely to participate regardless of their ability. This trend is true throughout the duration of children and young people's school years. Whilst younger children have an emphasis on 'play', older children focus more on ability.

These issues sit alongside the more commonly known barriers to participation among females. Often the 'fear of judgement', feeling self-conscious or feeling like they're not good enough will prevent women from participating. This may be related to their ability, their appearance or many other factors. Other barriers that may prevent women and girls from participating include feeling conscious about body image, lacking motivation or wishing to take part alongside friends or family.

Of course, we know the common barriers but every individual will have their own set of reasons preventing participation in sport and physical activity.

Area

Male

Female

England

24.0%

26.1%

Herefordshire & Worcestershire

23.9%

27.8%

Herefordshire

23.5%

30.1%

Worcestershire

24.0%

27.1%

Area

Male

Female

England

11.3%

13.2%

Herefordshire & Worcestershire

12.2%

14.5%

Herefordshire

13.5%

13.6%

Worcestershire

11.8%

14.8%

Area

Male

Female

England

64.7%

60.7%

Herefordshire & Worcestershire

63.9%

57.6%

Herefordshire

63.0%

56.2%

Worcestershire

64.2%

58.1%

Ante-natal and Post-natal females

One specific cohort of women who are particularly vulnerable to becoming inactive are ante-natal and post-natal females. Whilst it can be a very exciting time, pregnancy presents lots of unique worries, problems and concerns. Often keeping active appears less of a priority for this group of women and many become significantly less active during pregnancy. This, along with many myths suggesting that exercise can cause birth complications, results in many pre and post-natal women falling within the inactive bracket.

The NHS encourages women to begin or remain active during their pregnancy. Women are encouraged to maintain their usual daily physical activity or exercise. This may include running, yoga, dancing or even walking to the shops and back, for as long as your feel comfortable. According to the NHS, exercise is not dangerous for your baby and there is in fact some evidence that active women are less likely to experience problems in later pregnancy and labour.

Key organisations:

Women in Sport - https://www.womeninsport.org/

Sport England - https://www.sportengland.org/

Women's Sport Trust - https://www.womenssporttrust.com/

Sources:

Sport England's Active Lives Adults Survey

Sport England's Active Lives Children and Young People Survey

Sport England's This Girl Can - https://www.sportengland.org/campaigns-and-our-work/this-girl-can

NHS - https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pregnancy-exercise/

Tags: Active Lives, Herefordshire, Insight, March, Physical Activity, Women and Girls, Worcestershire

Posted: Mon, 03 Feb 2020 15:00 by Thomas Lawley

January - New Year, New Blog

Hello and happy New Year. Welcome to the first insight blog of 2020!

In the spirit of the main stream fashion of 'new year, new me'. The insight blogs will be changing slightly as we begin the New Year. The blogs will still provide you with all the good stuff like; funding bids, research projects, key projects provided by us at Sports Partnership Herefordshire and Worcestershire, as well as insight about Herefordshire and Worcestershire. However, to try and give this blogs more of a focus and hopefully make them more relevant, future blogs will be taking on a key theme for each month.

This month's theme is Women and Girls coinciding with the relaunch of Sport England's 'This Girl Can'.

Insight

Here at Sports Partnership Herefordshire and Worcestershire, we've just had our own This Girl Can conference. The aim of this conference was to educate leisure providers, schools and local development officers of the gender gap that we face locally and nationally when it comes to physical activity participation. Alongside tackling the participation gap, we are also looking to try and provide support for mental health issues that face women and girls in their everyday life, which in turn become barriers to participation.

The Stats

The Active Lives May 18/19 report details participation rates across England. The report revealed that there is still a gender gap in terms of participation. Women (61%) are less likely to be active than men (65%). Conversely Women (26%) are more likely to be inactive than men (24%). More locally the picture remains the same – women (57.6%) across Herefordshire and Worcestershire are less likely to be active than men (63.9%). This gap is maintained when looking at both county's individually. With Worcestershire women (58.1%) being marginally more active than women (56.2%) in Herefordshire, but still are less active than their male counterparts.

As with adults, the gender gap always exists in children and young people. According to Sport England's most recent publication (academic year 18/19), under half (43%) of girls are active for 60 minutes every day. This, in comparison to boys, where just over half (51%) are active for 60 minutes a day. Although it is not all doom and gloom as both boys and girls saw an increase in participation from last year (Boys: +3.8%, Girls: 3.2%). What seems to be more concerning is that young girls (30%) are more inactive than boys (27%), evidencing a gender gap on both sides of physical activity participation. This trend where girls are less active than boys is seen across all ages, with the largest gap appearing in years 7-11 (9% difference).

Why is there a participation gap?

So, clearly there is an issue where women and girls are taking part in sport or physical activity. This on its own is useless to everyone. So why are women and girls less likely to take part? Research from Sport England has suggested that there are several reasons that can be attributed to the gender participation gap. Firstly, young girl's attitudes to sport are different to young boys. Young girls are said to have very binary views when it comes to participating in Sport or physical activity. By this it's meant that girls either see themselves as good or bad at an activity, and this has a massive impact on whether they are will take part or not. Boys however do not appear to hold as much relevance to their ability when deciding to take part in an activity or not. Secondly, girls are less likely to enjoy being active than boys. As part of Sport England's Active Lives Children and Young People survey detailed children's attitudes towards sport and physical activity. The results show that girls are less confident in taking part in sport or physical activity, which in turn impacts their subsequent enjoyment. Thirdly, research from Women in Sport has highlighted that pressure of school work and low confidence present themselves as substantial barriers to taking part for girls. Women in Sport's research stated that alongside pressure of school work, dissatisfaction with their body image represents a significant barrier to girls. Body image represents a larger problem for girls (1 in 3) at ages 14-16 years, than younger girls ages 13 and below. Finally, it has been reported that girls simply do not see the relevance of the skills they learn in PE to their lives (45% of girls compared to 60% of boys).

How do we solve these problems?

There is no catch all approach to solving the women and girls participation issue. However, there are steps that can be taken which can create a more positive environment for women and girls to feel safe and motivated to participate in sport and physical activity.

Recommendations for schools (from Women in Sport)

1. Make PE and physical activity relevant to girls' lives.

2. Empower girls through involving them in design and delivery of PE and physical activities.

3. Develop role models by using girls as positive influencers and advocates with their peer group.

4. Place developing self-confidence at the heart of PE and physical activity.

5. Recognise the power of friends to drive progress.

6. Take a long-term approach to engaging girls.

Recommendations for activity providers and organisations (Sport England)

1) Start where women are – being real and friendly will engage women

- Use their language: friendly and informal

- Use pictures and images of real women

- Show an understanding of real issues (looking sweaty, pressure of time)

2) Show women what sport can do for them personally – they want to feel confident doing sport

- Use real role models showing women confident being themselves (hot and not bothered)

3) Show women that sport is a good use of their time socially

- Communicate that this is a good use of their time – having some run time with the girls (or their kids)

4) Design the offer to make it easy for women to do sport – don't expect women to change to fit sport

- Right time – be open or run classes to suit women's lifestyle (work and family)

- Right place – close to where women are, with the right facilities (changing rooms, hairdryers etc)

- Right welcome – make sure the welcome is warm by reception/ class leaders

- Right company – ideally they should be with people like them

- Right gear – reduce the fear of the wrong gear

5) Focus on repeat participation – ensure you design the offer to keep women engaged, not just to attend once

- Once engaged, keep in touch with them

- Encourage communities of interest: women spending with their kids, with the girls (meeting up after for food or drink), or seeking to achieve more

- Make your communications personal

- Appeal to all the senses (music etc)

Thanks for reading, and make sure you get active yourself!

Links and references

Gender Gap – Attitudes towards physical activity in teenagers

Sport England – Sport for All? January 2020

Sport England – Active Lives Adult Survey – May 18/19, November 17/18

Sport England – Active Lives Adult Survey – Understanding behaviour

Sport England – Active Lives Children and Young People Survey – Academic Year 2017/18

Sport England – Active Lives Children and Young People Survey – Attitudes towards sport and physical activity

Sport England - Applying the insight – women & girls checklist

Tags: Active Lives, Blog, Herefordshire, Insight, January, Sport England, Sports Partnership, This Girl Can, Women and Girls, Women in Sport, Worcestershire

Posted: Fri, 22 Nov 2019 15:00 by Thomas Lawley

November ramblings

November ramblings

Hello and welcome to November's edition of the insight blog.

This month's recap looks over our recent club survey and young children becoming less active.

Club survey 2019

36 clubs completed this year's club survey. A range of clubs completed the survey; from well-known popular sports such as Rugby and football to perhaps more niche activities such as bowling and Scottish dance. Clubs were asked a range of questions related to their inclusivity of underrepresented groups, number of volunteers, demographics of their participants, their top 3 priorities and their upcoming challenges. A snapshot of the results are detailed below.

  1. Clubs were asked whether their club was inclusive and welcoming of the following groups;

a) Inactive people; 28 clubs

b) Older people; 29 clubs

c) Women and girls; 34 clubs

d) Individuals with a disability/ long term health condition; 27 clubs

e) Inactive children; 28 clubs

f) Individuals with previous cancer diagnosis or having cancer treatment; 24 clubs

g) Workplace; 14 clubs

  1. Clubs were asked whether their club delivered sessions specifically for the following groups;

a) Inactive people; 28 clubs

b) Older people; 29 clubs

c) Women and girls; 34 clubs

d) Individual's with a disability/ long term health condition; 27 clubs

e) Inactive children; 28 clubs

f) Individuals with previous cancer diagnosis or having cancer treatment; 24 clubs

g) Workplace; 14 clubs

  1. Number (an average of all clubs) of volunteers, coaches, leaders or helpers currently have within the following groups;

a) Females; 10

b) Older People; 7

c) Individuals with a disability/ long term health condition; 1

d) Young people at risk of offending; 6

  1. Number (an average of all clubs) of participants from the following groups;

a) Females; 34

b) Older People; 53

c) Individuals with a disability/ long term health condition; 12

d) Young people at risk of offending; 13

  1. Current top 3 priorities across the 36 clubs;

a) Increase participation from inactive young people

b) Increase participation from inactive adults

c) Funding

  1. Current top 3 challenges;

a) Lack of funding

b) Attracting/maintaining children and young people participation

c) Having enough qualified coaches

Children become less active each year of primary school

In more concerning news, a study by the British Heart Foundation has found children at age 11 are doing more than an hour less of physical activity a week than at age 6.

The study revealed a dramatic drop in children's physical activity levels by the time they finish primary school. Monitoring the behaviour of more than 2,000 children from 57 schools across South West England during primary school, it found children became 17 minutes less active per week every year. Children wore an accelerometer for five days, including two weekend days, which provided an accurate assessment of how many minutes per day the children participated in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) – enough to get them slightly out of breath and sweaty.

The UK Chief Medical Officers recommend that children do an hour of MVPA every day. Although this should be viewed as a minimum, and children should be encouraged to do more, and be as active as possible.

Tags: Blog, Club Survey, Herefordshire, Insight, November, Worcestershire

Posted: Fri, 25 Oct 2019 12:00 by Thomas Lawley

October observations

October observations

Adult Active Lives Survey

On 17th October Sport England released their Active Lives Adult Survey May 17/18 report. The national picture shows the highest ever levels of activity have been recorded, with 1 million more people physically active than when the survey began. Based on data gathered from 180,000 respondents (aged 16+) in the 12 months from May 2018 to May 2019, 1,015,700 more people are active compared to when the survey started, in 2015. That takes the total number of active people – those doing at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week – up to 28.6 million.

The number of inactive people – doing fewer than 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week – is down to 11.2 million, a decrease of 131,700 since 2015 and the lowest figure ever recorded by the survey.

The local picture in regards to Herefordshire and Worcestershire shows a consistency with previous survey releases. Herefordshire and Worcestershire has remained largely the same with the proportion of the population who are active, fairly active and inactive.

The positives to take away from this are; there is no significant increase in people becoming inactive across both counties. A large proportion of both counties are active, with both seeing increases in that area – whilst these aren't significant increases.

Please find the activity stats for Herefordshire and Worcestershire down below.

Herefordshire and Worcestershire AP;

Active: 62.3%, (0.4%+ change in last 12 months – not significant)

Fairly active: 12.9%, (-0.4% change in last 12 months – not significant)

Inactive: 22.9%, (0% change in last 12 months – not significant)

Herefordshire;

Active: 63.2%, (4.2%+ change in last 12 months - no significant change)

Fairly active: 12%, (-3.1% change in last 12 months - no significant change)

Inactive: 24.8%, (-1.1% change in last 12 months - no significant change)

Worcestershire;

Active: 62%, (-0.9% change in last 12 months - no significant change)

Fairly Active: 13.2%, (0.5%+ change in last 12 months - no significant change)

Inactive: 24.8%, (0.4%+ change in last 12 months - no significant change)

Bromsgrove:

Active: 61.8%, (-0.5% change in last 12 months - no significant change)

Fairly active: 14.2%, (3.2%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Inactive: 24%, (-2.6% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Malvern Hills:

Active: 62.8%, (-3.2% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Fairly active: 11.4%, (0% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Inactive: 25.8%, (3.2%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Redditch:

Active: 59.9%, (-0.6% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Fairly active: 13.1%, 0% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Inactive: 27.1%, (3.2%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Worcester:

Active: 64%, (-2.3% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Fairly active: 11.1%, (-1% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Inactive: 24.9%, (3.2%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Wychavon:

Active: 61.8%, (0.2%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Fairly active: 16.1%, (2.4%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Inactive: 22.1%, (-2.6% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Wyre Forest:

Active: 61.4%, (0.3%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Fairly active: 12.3%, (-2.1% change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Inactive: 26.3%, (1.8%+ change in last 12 months – no significant change)

Tags: Active Lives, Herefordshire, Insight, October, Physical Activity, Worcestershire

Posted: Tue, 24 Sep 2019 11:30 by Thomas Lawley

September Insight

September has been a quiet month here at Sports Partnership, as a result I only have one piece of insight to bring you. The recently published Chief Medical Officers' Physical Activity Guidelines.

UK Chief Medical Officers' Physical Activity Guidelines

UK Chief Medical Officers' (CMO) new Physical Activity Guidelines have been released, covering different age groups, detailing the volume, duration, frequency and type of physical activity required across the life course to achieve general health benefits. The guidelines present thresholds for the achievement of optimal health benefits at the recommended levels of physical activity in terms of strength, moderate and vigorous physical activity, and balance activities. The report replaces the 2011 version and draws upon global evidence to present guidelines for different age groups, covering volume, duration, frequency and type of physical activity required one's life to achieve health benefits.

Since 2011 the evidence supporting engaging in physical activity across every stage of life has become more compelling. In children, regular physical exercise is associated with improved learning and attainment, better mental health, cardiovascular fitness and healthy weight status. In adults, regular physical activity has been shown to have a positive effect on chronic health conditions; coronary health disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, mental health conditions and social isolation. Additionally to all of this, regular physical activity can help deliver cost savings for health and care systems. In short, more physical activity results in greater health benefits.

The new report stress the importance of strength training above other forms of physical exercise. Especially as you age, where there is a natural decline in muscle mass and bone density – this usually occurs around 50 years of age. Strength training should be utilised to delay this natural decline for as long as possible. Maintaining strength has been shown to being a strong indicator of minimising falls in later life. Strength training alongside weight bearing exercises such as running are also encouraged in children and young people to maximise strengthening bones at an early age. Finally another key recommendation from the report in the removal of a minimum amount of physical activity required to achieve some health benefits. The key message is to be active in some capacity every day. Ideally hitting 60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity every day. Despite the removal of a minimum amount of physical activity, these remain useful targets for inactive people who are starting their physical activity journey.

Please find below a summary of the recommendations for each age group;

Infants (less than 1 year):

  • Aim to be physically active several times every day in a variety of ways, including interactive floor based activity e.g. crawling.
  • For infants not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes of tummy time spread throughout the day while awake (and other movements such as reaching and grasping, pushing and pulling themselves independently, or rolling over); more is better.

Toddlers (1-2 years):

  • Toddlers should spend at least 180 minutes (3 hours) per day in a variety of physical activities at any intensity, including active and outdoor play, spread throughout the day; more is better.

Pre-schoolers (3-4 years):

  • Pre-schoolers should spend at least 180 minutes (3 hours) per day in a variety of physical activities spread throughout the day, including active and outdoor play. More is better; the 180 minutes should include at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity

Children and Young People (5-18 years)

  • Children and young people should engage in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity for an average of at least 60 minutes per day across the week. This can include all forms of activity such as physical education, active travel, after-school activities, play and sports.
  • Children and young people should engage in a variety of types and intensities of physical activity across the week to develop movement skills, muscular fitness, and bone strength.
  • Children and young people should aim to minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary, and when physically possible should break up long periods of not moving with at least light physical activity.

Adults (19-64 years):

  • For good physical and mental health, adults should aim to be physically active every day. Any activity is better than none, and more is better still.
  • Adults should do activities to develop or maintain strength in the major muscle groups. These could include heavy gardening, carrying heavy shopping, or resistance exercise. Muscle strengthening activities should be done on at least two days a week, but any strengthening activity is better than none.
  • Each week, adults should accumulate at least 150 minutes (2 1/2 hours) of moderate intensity activity (such as brisk walking or cycling); or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity (such as running); or even shorter durations of very vigorous intensity activity (such as sprinting or stair climbing); or a combination of moderate, vigorous and very vigorous intensity activity.
  • Adults should aim to minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary, and when physically possible should break up long periods of inactivity with at least light physical activity.

Older adults (65 years+):

  • Older adults should participate in daily physical activity to gain health benefits, including maintenance of good physical and mental health, wellbeing, and social functioning. Some physical activity is better than none: even light activity brings some health benefits compared to being sedentary, while more daily physical activity provides greater health and social benefits.
  • Older adults should maintain or improve their physical function by undertaking activities aimed at improving or maintaining muscle strength, balance and flexibility on at least two days a week. These could be combined with sessions involving moderate aerobic activity or could be additional sessions aimed specifically at these components of fitness.
  • Each week older adults should aim to accumulate 150 minutes (two and a half hours) of moderate intensity aerobic activity, building up gradually from current levels. Those who are already regularly active can achieve these benefits through 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity, or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity, to achieve greater benefits. Weight-bearing activities which create an impact through the body help to maintain bone health.
  • Older adults should break up prolonged periods of being sedentary with light activity when physically possible, or at least with standing, as this has distinct health benefits for older people.

This provides a summary of the report that has been published. To read the full report please visit the link below.

2019 CMO report

Tags: Blog, Herefordshire, Insight, Medical guidelines, Physical Activity, September, Worcestershire

Posted: Fri, 16 Aug 2019 13:00 by Thomas Lawley

August Amazement

August Amazement

Hello and welcome back to the Insight blog!

As you may be aware, we at SPHW have released some brand new district profiles for Herefordshire and Worcestershire. These profiles cover a wide range of things about each area. Whether this is which industries are the biggest employers are? Or you are looking to put a funding bid together and you need to know the cost of physical inactivity in your area.

Down below please find some handpicked highlights for each district;

Bromsgrove:

Bromsgrove has a population total of 97,594. Of the population in the workforce, 68% are working in a full time capacity with 32% in part-time roles. The three biggest industries (Transportation and Storage, Administrative and Support Service Activities and Human Health and Social Work Activities) in Bromsgrove represent just under half (49.2%) of the jobs. Bromsgrove has a relatively economically active population with 79% of 16-64 year olds either employed or actively looking for a job.

It is estimated that 24,400 people in Bromsgrove are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, which has been estimated to cost in the region of £7.4 million. Of this, £879,900 has been attributed to additional health and social care costs. The other £6.5 million was spent on other public services as a result of physical inactivity. Despite this 81% of Bromsgrove residents are satisfied with their local area, compared with Worcestershire average of 79%.

Bromsgrove has a life expectancy of 81.9 years (female: 84 years, male: 79.7 years), which is in line with the national average.

Herefordshire:

Herefordshire has a total population of 189,300. Of the population in the workforce, 63% are working in full time positions, with 37% in part-time positions. 50% of the jobs in Herefordshire are provided by three main industries – Wholesale and retail trade (17.3%), Human health and social work activities (17.3%) and Manufacturing (16%). As well as this, agricultural workers represent 1 in 19 jobs across the county. Herefordshire has an economically active population with 82% of 16-64 year olds are either employed or actively looking for a job.

It is estimated that 48,200 people are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, at a cost of £13.3 million. It has been calculated that £1.8 million has been spent in additional health and social care. With the £13.3 million spent on other public services. Despite the additional spending as a result of physical inactivity, 80% of Herefordshire residents are satisfied with their local area.

Herefordshire has a life expectancy of 81.7 years (female: 83.6 years, male: 79.8 years), which is in line with the national average.

Malvern Hills:

Malvern Hills has a total population of 77,165. Of the population in the workforce, 61% working in full time roles, with 36% working in a part-time capacity. 53.6% of all jobs in Malvern Hills are provided by four industries - Wholesale and Retail trade (14.3%), Manufacturing (14.3%), Human health and social work activities (12.5%) and Accommodation and Food Service Activities (12.5%). Malvern Hills are a relatively economically active population with 78% of 16-64 year olds are either employed or actively looking for a job.

It's reported that 19,700 people are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, incurring a cost of £6.8 million. It is estimated that £812,000 is spent on additional health and social care costs. With the remaining £6 million for other public services. On a positive note, 85% of Malvern residents are satisfied with their local area.

Malvern Hills has a life expectancy of 82.4 years (female: 83.7 years, male: 81 years), which is in line with the national average.

Redditch:

Redditch has a total population of 85,204. Of the population who are working, 68% work in a full time capacity, with 29% working in part-time roles. 54% of all jobs in the Redditch area are provided by three industries - Manufacturing (21.1%), Wholesale and retail trade, (21.1%) and Human health and social work activities (11.8%). Redditch, like their district counterparts have a relatively economically active population with 87% of 16-64 year olds are either employed or actively looking for a job.

It's reported that 21,100 people are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, incurring a cost of £6.2 million. It is estimated that £739,000 is spent on additional health and social care costs. With the remaining £5.5 million for other public services. On a positive note, 79% of Redditch residents are satisfied with their local area.

Redditch has a life expectancy of 81.4 years (female: 83.6 years, males: 79.2 years).

Worcester city:

Worcester city has a population of 102,314. Of this population who are working, 62% in a full time capacity, with 38% part-time roles. 35.9% of all jobs in Worcester are provided by two main industries – Human Health and Social Work Activities (20.8%) and Wholesale and Retail Trade (15.1%). Worcester is in line with the district counterparts with a high economically active population with 83% of 16-64 year olds are either employed or actively looking for a job.

It's reported that 24,500 people are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, incurring a cost of £8.4 million. It is estimated that £1 million is spent on additional health and social care costs. With the remaining £7.4 million for other public services. On a positive note, 78% of Worcester residents are satisfied with their local area.

Worcester has a life expectancy of 81.2 years (female: 83.7 years, male: 78.6 years).

Worcestershire:

Worcestershire has a population total of 588,370. Of this total, 66% of working full time jobs with 34% working part-time roles. 42.7% of all jobs in Worcestershire are provided by three main industries – Wholesale and Retail Trade (16.1%), Human Health and Social Work Activities (13%) and Manufacturing (12.6%). Worcestershire has an economically active population with 82% of 16-64 year olds either in employment or available to start work.

It's reported that 145,500 people are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, incurring a cost of £49.6 million. It is estimated that £5.9 million is spent on additional health and social care costs. With the remaining £43.7 million for other public services. On a positive note, 79% of Worcestershire residents are satisfied with their local area.

Worcestershire has a life expectancy of 81.9 years (female: 83.9 years, male: 79.9 years).

Wychavon:

Wychavon has a population total of 125,378. Of this total, 69% of working full time jobs with 31% working part-time roles. 35.2% of all jobs in Wychacon are provided by two main industries – Manufacturing (17.6%) and Wholesale and Retail Trade (17.6%). Wychavon has an economically active population with 83% of 16-64 year olds either in employment or available to start work.

It's reported that 30,700 people are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, incurring a cost of £11.8 million. It is estimated that £1.4 million is spent on additional health and social care costs. With the remaining £10.4 million for other public services. On a positive note, 83% of Wychavon residents are satisfied with their local area.

Wychavon has a life expectancy average of 83.2% (female: 85.4 years, male: 81 years).

Wyre Forest

Wyre Forest has a population total of 100,715. Of this total, 59% of working full time jobs with 41% working part-time roles. 45.3% of all jobs in Wyre Forest are provided by three industries –Wholesale and Retail Trade (21.9%), Human Health and Social Work Activities (12.5%) and Manufacturing (10.9%). Wyre Forest has an economically active population with 83% of 16-64 year olds either in employment or available to start work.

It's reported that 25,200 people are undertaking significantly less than the recommended level of physical activity, incurring a cost of £9.2 million. It is estimated that £1.1 million is spent on additional health and social care costs. With the remaining £8.1 million for other public services. Continuing on this negative trend, only 65% of Wyre Forest residents are satisfied with their local area – the lowest in Herefordshire and Worcestershire.

Wyre Forest has a life expectancy average of 81 years (female: 83.1 years, male: 79.4 years), which is in line with the national average.

To look through the profiles yourself please go to 'Local Insight' in the Insight tab.

Thanks for reading and have a good August.

Yours insightfully,

Insight Tom.

Tags: District Profiles, Herefordshire, Impact reports, Insight, Worcestershire

Posted: Mon, 22 Jul 2019 13:00 by Thomas Lawley

July Joy

July Joy

Hello and welcome to July's edition of the blog! It's been a busy time at SPHW the past couple of months with several Workplace Challenge events as well as School Games.

School Games

Across July 2nd and 3rd, we had our Herefordshire and Worcestershire School Games at Bromsgrove School and Hereford Leisure Centre respectively. Across the two games 3300 children and young people took part.

An overview

3300 children and young people took part across 24 sports 40 separate competitions. Almost 400 young leaders from several schools and colleges volunteered to help run and supervise the event. There were no safeguarding incidents registered with organisers across both events.

Evaluation headlines

Almost 300 evaluations forms were completed across both Herefordshire and Worcestershire.

  • 100% of those asked would come back again
  • 94.6% enjoyed taking part in School Games
  • 85.4% were excited to be a part of School Games
  • 88% felt part of a team whilst participating in School Games
  • 85.6% would encourage their friends to take part in future School Games
  • 98.3% of children said they felt safe at School Games (Herefordshire - 96.6%, Worcestershire - 100%)

A fantastic two days of hard work by both competitors and staff alike resulted in two great School Games. We can't wait to do it again in Winter!

'Snacktivity' approach to exercise?

Loughborough University is leading a multi-million-pound research programme to investigate whether a 'snacktivity' approach to physical activity can be effective in improving people's health.

The Loughborough team will be working with colleagues at the Universities of Birmingham, Leicester, Edinburgh, and the Birmingham Community Healthcare Foundation NHS Trust on the £2.2 million project, which has been funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)

Current public health guidelines states that over a week, adults should achieve at least 150-minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity, spread across five sessions of around 30 minutes. However very few people currently reach this weekly target, and to try and achieve it those who are inactive need to make significant changes to their lives.

'Snacktivity' looks to utilise a different approach to achieve the current target of 150 minutes of physical activity a week. Instead of dedicating five 30 minute sessions across a week, which can be difficult to fit into modern busy lifestyles. 'Snacktivity' instead focuses on small, but frequent, doses of regular moderate intensity physical activity throughout the day so that at least 150 minutes of physical activity is accumulated weekly. A physical activity 'snack' typically lasts between two and five minutes and includes activities such as walk-talk conversations, walking coffee breaks and using the stairs instead of the lift.

The researchers will use a smartphone application (snackApp) synchronised with a wrist worn physical activity tracker to enable participants in the intervention to self-monitor their 'snacktivity' and get feedback on their behaviour. The snackApp will prompt physical activity after one hour of no activity. The research team will test whether this approach helps to make the public more active compared to the current guidance for physical activity.

Tags: Herefordshire, Insight, July, School Games, Schools, Worcestershire

Posted: Tue, 28 May 2019 11:00 by Thomas Lawley

May madness

May madness

Welcome to fourth edition of the insight blog. Read on as we look back on all the goings on in May.

Herefordshire and Worcestershire Impact reports

The first of our impact reports for the districts across Herefordshire and Worcestershire has been released this past month. These impact reports will be a helpful resource for local organisations, providing key information to help support potential funding bids with easily accessible key stats.

An overview of some key stats of the report are as follows. Over 80% of Herefordshire residents are satisfied with the local area as a place to live, satisfied with their home as a place to live and feel safe when outside in their local area during the day. On average, life satisfaction in Herefordshire is similar to nationally. However, 10% express low life satisfaction, compared to 5% in the UK.

In terms of physical activity, Herefordshire is in line with the national averages across all three activity categories. 59% of Herefordshire adults are Active (150+ minutes per week), national average is 62%. 15% of adults are fairly active (30-149 minutes per week) national average is 13%. Finally 26% of adults are inactive (less than 30 minutes per week) national average is 25%. This means that are around 41,000 physically inactive adults in Herefordshire.

Bike to School Week June 3-7

Organised by the Sustrans charity. The week is designed to encourage parents and kids to start cycling to school.

Childhood obesity is a growing concern. Only 60 per cent of boys and 40 per cent of girls are getting the minimum of an hours' moderate physical activity a day they need to stay healthy. On average children now spend more time sat in a car travelling to school than the time allocated to physical education on the school curriculum. Currently only four per cent of children cycle to school. That's despite nearly half saying they'd like to and the vast majority living within a reasonable cycling distance. That more don't cycle is largely linked to safety concerns, but these are nowhere near as high as perceived. Cycling to school improves a child's physical health. They are also more alert, less stressed and sleep better. It helps improve a child's independence and self-confidence. There's even clear evidence that their academic performance improves. There are wider community benefits too. Cars on the school run account for about 20 per cent of traffic at the 8am-9am peak. They add to congestion, cause major parking and safety problems around the school gate and contribute to air pollution including nitrogen dioxide – a pollutant that stunts children's growth and increases risks of asthma and lung cancer.

Parents themselves also benefit. They don't have to spend time on the school run, an activity estimated to collectively cost them £520 million a year.

For more information on this, the Bromsgrove advertiser have written an article on the upcoming week (www.bromsgroveadvertiser.co.uk/news/regional/worcestershire/17667345.push-bike-clear-benefits-of-cycling-to-school/), alternatively head over to the Sustrans website to learn more about the week as well as the great work they're doing. www.sustrans.org.uk/

Tags: Herefordshire, Impact reports, Insight, May, Worcestershire

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Tom Lawley

Tom Lawley

Project Officer (Information and Insight)

  • Insight
  • Data analysis
  • Monitoring and evaluation
  • Active Lives
Telephone
01905 542380